Photo
Quote

"

○×式の具体例が非常にわかりやすいのです。

  三点リーダー、ダッシュは二個続ける。

 三点リーダー……←コレです。
 ダッシュ……「―」
 
閉じかっこの前後に句読点をつけない

×「自分、それはないわ。」
×「自分、それはないわ」。
○「自分、それはないわ」

感嘆符の後ろは空白を開ける

×つまり人類は滅亡する!な、なんだってー!
○つまり人類は滅亡する! な、なんだってー!

クエスチョンマークも同様に

×俺が悪いんかな?かな?
○俺が悪いんかな? かな?

例外として、閉じかっこがある場合や感嘆符が続く場合などは空白を開けません。

×「ブラじゃないよ! 」
○「ブラじゃないよ!」

×「ブーラーでーしょー! ? 」
○「ブーラーでーしょー!?」

(最初の一文字を空白)しまった!(一文字を空白)これまで閉じかっこの前後に句読点をつけていたかもしれない!(感嘆符の後ろは空白を開ける)

"

Source: yellowblog
Photo
cl4p-tpwrites:

GEORGE ORWELL’S ”POLITICS AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE” includes some of my favorite ‘writing rules’ ever collected. They are as follows, and the entire article is below the cut:
Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
Never use a long word where a short one will do.
If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
Never use the passive where you can use the active.
Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.
Read More

cl4p-tpwrites:

GEORGE ORWELL’S ”POLITICS AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE” includes some of my favorite ‘writing rules’ ever collected. They are as follows, and the entire article is below the cut:

  1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
  2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
  3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
  4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
  5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
  6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

Read More

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Source: cleverhelp
Photo Set

asianhistory:

General:

Reddit Threads:

SRS  (Spaced Repetition flashcards)

Arabic:

Chinese (Mostly/All Mandarin):

Gujarati:
Hindi:

Indonesian - Bhasa Indonesian:

Korean:

Japanese:

Malay:


Tamil

Thai:

So You Want to Learn… List:

Other:

  • Tumblr tags: #learning _________ 
  • Can I become Fluent in ______ in ______ months/weeks/days?
     
    No. You can’t. 
  • Can I learn Japanese from just watching Anime/Korean from Kpop/Chinese from Wuxia films?
    Not on your life. Do you only speak the english you know from Spongebob? N’SYNC? The 300? Didn’t think so.
  • What about Rosetta Stone?
    For $180-$399 dollars? Are you insane? The program is built to teach you the Romantic languages.  If you buy Rosetta stone for $400, and pass up every free resource on this list, I doubt your desire to actually learn anything. Don’t do it to yourself. That is a lot of money you probably won’t get back.
  • But I heard that Chinese/Japanese/Korean/Arabic/etc is really difficult:
    Well if over a billion Chinese people can speak Chinese, why can’t you? No really, don’t let something like this bother you. No, this is not the ease of moving from a English to a Romance language or German, but hey, if you wanted to learn German (and all those ridiculous cases) you’d be doing that. 
  • But what about ______?
    I have knowledge on resources mostly limited to JPN/CHI/KOR classes. This is a participatory list, which I am more than grateful to take submissions for.
Source: asianhistory
Text

clevergirlhelps:

Basic Structure

There are a few ways to structure dialogue. These are the most common ways to structure a line, although I haven’t seen 7 in a very long time.

  1. “The dog’s outside. He’s finally stopped barking,” Anne said.
  2. “The dog’s outside. He’s finally stopped barking,” said Anne.
  3. “The dog’s outside,” Anne said. “He’s finally stopped barking.”
  4. “The dog’s outside,” said Anne. “He’s finally stopped barking.”
  5. Anne said, “The dog’s outside. He’s finally stopped barking.”
  6. “The dog’s outside.” Anne sighed with relief. “He’s finally stopped barking.”
  7. Said Anne, “The dog’s outside. He’s finally stopped barking.”

It’s a good idea to avoid using the same method twice. Two or three or four (!) straight lines of 1’s “X said” or 6’s sentences broken up by a dialogue will sound strange.

Notice how the dialogue tag (“Anna said” and variations thereof) only goes in an area that does not impede the flow of dialogue. In the case of 3, 4, and 6, the dialogue tag or action actually enhances the period’s long pause. Only place dialogue tags at the beginning or end of a phrase, or where there would normally be a period, semicolon, colon, comma, or other punctuation indicating rest.

Dialogue Tags

A dialogue tag is a word + the person saying it. “He said”, “she said”, “they said”, etc. are all dialogue tags. The most common verb in a dialogue tag is “to say” (said, says, say, etc.) A lot of authors like it for its simplicity and unobtrusiveness. For those who insist “said is dead” (implying “said” is so bland it shouldn’t be used anymore), there are a bajillion other dialogue tags to play with.

Some verbs should not be used as dialogue tags.

“I’m really grateful,” Kiandra smiled

“This is ridiculous,” Aelwen sighed.

A dialogue tag is there to tell the reader how the character says something. You cannot say something smilingly or sighingly. You might say it happily or regretfully.

“I’m really grateful,” Kiandra said with a smile // “I’m really grateful,” Kiandra said happily

“This is ridiculous,” Aelwen said. He sighed sadly // “This is ridiculous.” Aelwen sighed.

Actions are not dialogue tags.

Adverbs

Adverbs are the little “-ly” words you add at the end of dialogue tag to show how a character is saying something.

“I don’t know,” Vanhi said uncertainly.

“I can’t wait!” Quetzel said excitedly.

Excitedly and uncertainly are the adverbs in this case. There is a list of adverbs here and here. Don’t get too hooked on adverbs. They’re great for helping when the meaning of a line is unclear.

Take this sentence:

“I love you,” Mirage said.

By itself this sentence isn’t much. You have no idea how Mirage is saying it, and it could be hundreds of different ways. Now modify that.

“I love you,” Mirage said desperately.

“I love you,” Mirage said sarcastically.

“I love you,” Mirage said joyfully.

“I love you,” Mirage said defiantly.

Now you know exactly how Mirage is saying it.

Recently, there’s been a movement to do away with adverbs or to use adverbs sparingly. Most adverbs are unnecessary. You can guess how a character is saying something by context. For example,

Myrtle kissed Mirage’s cheek and pressed a chocolate into her hand.

“I love you,” Mirage said.

You can assume that Mirage is saying this in loving or affectionate voice without the adverb being there. You can also use different dialogue tags to express the same emotion.

“I love you,” Mirage yelled

Vs.

“I love you,” Mirage said loudly.

Finally, adverbs sound funny if you use them one after another.

“I despise you,” Makai said sharply.

“I don’t think you’re much to look at, either,” Hagan said fiercely.

“I can’t believe Falk put us on this stupid date,” Makai said crossly.

If you’re addicted to adverbs, restrict them to every ten dialogue tags. If you aren’t addicted to adverbs, then just use them whenever you feel you need them. You can always delete them later if you think they’re unnecessary. 

Abandoning Your Dialogue Tags

There are some cases where you can forgo using dialogue tags altogether. When two people are speaking with each other in a natural give-and-take pattern, the audience knows that they are the ones speaking, and in what order they are speaking. See below.

“The dog’s outside,” Anne said. “He’s finally stopped barking.”

“I don’t understand why he’s so frightened of the vacuum,” said Brenda.

“If you were the size of a Chihuahua, I think a lot of things would frighten you,” Anne said.

“Was that a crack about my height?”

“Shorty!”

You can tell Brenda said, “Was that a crack about my height?” because Anne spoke before her, and you can tell Anne said, “Shorty!” because Brenda spoke before her. Do not use this trick if more than two people are speaking at a time. You could introduce a third person like this:

“Was that a crack about my height?”

“Shorty!”

“Cut it out,” Dan said crossly.

“Can’t we have a little fun?” Anne asked.

“You’re so annoying.”

Since we specified it’s Anne and Dan speaking in turn, it can only be Dan who says, “You’re so annoying.”

Read More

Source: clevergirlhelps
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thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.
→ GENERAL
Improvement
Improve Your Writing Habits Now
5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
Improve Your Paras
Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
Writing Better Than You Normally Do
How’s My Driving?
Describing
A Description Resource
55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
Describing Skin Colors
Describing a Person: Adding Details
Emotions Vocabulary
90 Words For ‘Looks’
Be More Descriptive
Describe a Character’s Look Well
100 Words for Facial Expressions
To Show and Not To Tell
Words to Describe Facial Expressions
Describing Clothes
List of Actions
Tone, Feelings and Emotions
Masterlists
Writing Specific Characters
Character Guides
Writing Help for Writers
Ultimate Writing Resource List
Lots of RP Guides
Online Writing Resources
List of Websites to Help You Focus
Resources for Writing Bio’s
Helpful Links for Writing Help
General Writing Resources
Resources for Biography Writing
Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  Body Language
Body Language Cheat
Body Language Reference Cheat
Tips for Writers: Body Language
Types of Crying
Body Language: Mirroring
Grammar/Vocabulary
Words Instead of Walk (2)
Commonly Confused Adjectives
A Guide on Punctuation
Common Writing Mistakes
25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
Other Ways to Say..
Proofreading
300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
List of Misused Words
Words for Sex
100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
Words to Use More Often
Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
Three Self Editing Tips
Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
Synonyms for Common Words
Alternatives for ‘Smile’
Transitional Words
The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
A Case Of She Said, She Said
Writer’s Block
How to: Cure Writer’s Block
Some Tips on Writer’s Block
Got Writer’s Block?
6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block
→ APPLICATIONS
Application (Itself)
How to: Make That Application Your Bitch
How to: Make Your App Better
How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
10 Tips for Applying
Para (Sample)
Para Sample Ideas
5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
How to: Lengthen Short Para’s
Prompts
Drabble Stuff
Prompts List
Writing Prompts
Drabble Prompts
How to Get Into Character
Writing Challenges/Prompts
A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
Para Prompts & Ideas
Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
A List of Para Starters
→ GUIDES
Personalities
Angry
Bad Asses
Bitches (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Childishness
Emotional Detachment
Flirtatious
The Girl Next Door
Introverts (2)
Mean Persons (2)
Psychopaths
Party Girls
Rich (2) 
Rebels
Sarcasm
Serial Killers (2)
Shyness (2, 3)
Sluts
Villains (2)
Witt
Disorders
Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Attention Deficit Disorder
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Avoidant Personality Disorder
Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
Cotard Delusions
Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)   
Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
Facitious Disorders
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
Narcissistic Personality Disorder
Night Terrors
Kleptomania (2)
A Pyromaniac
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Psychopaths
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2)
Sex Addiction (2)
Schizophrenia (2)
Sociopaths (2)
Disabilities
Aspergers Syndrome
Apathy 
Someone Blind (2)
Cancer (2, 3)
Disability
Dyslexia
Muteness (2, 3)
Stutter
Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs
Actors
Ballet Dancer (2)
Christianity
Foreigners
Gamblers
Hinduism
Hitmen
Satanism
Smokers
Stoners
Taoism
Journalists
Vegetarians
Drugs
Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
Cocaine Influence
Ecstasy Influence (2)
Heroin Use
LSD Influence
Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
Opiate Use
Locations
Australia
Boston
California (2, 3)
England/Britain (2, 3, 4, 5)
New York
Prison
London
The South (2)
Genders
Females (2)
Males (2)
Transgenders
Supernatural
Vampires
Witches (2)
Werewolves
Other
Amnesia
Children
A Death Scene
Loosing Someone (2)
Old Persons
Physical Injuries (2, 3)
Sexual Abuse (2)
Fight Scenes (2, 3, 4)
Horror
Torture
→ CREATING CHARACTERS
Biography Writing
Components of Your Biographies
Character sheet (2, 3)
Need Help With Character Creation?
How to: Draw Inspiration for Characters From Music
How to: Write a Biography (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
How to: Write a Fully Developed Character
How to: Create a Cast of Characters (2)
Writing an Original Character (2, 3)
Creating Believable Characters (2, 3)
Bio Formats (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Little Things You Can Add To Your Bios
Connections (2)
Titles
Bio Twists
Names
Female Names (2, 3, 4, 5)
Male Names (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Last Names  (2, 3, 4)
Personalities
Jung’s 16 Personality Types
Underused Character Personalities
Birth-Order: Personality Traits
The Difference Between Personality and Behavior
How to: Show a Characters Personality In a Paragraph
16 Character Traits
Underused Personalities
Personality Traits

Positive (2)
Negative (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Both (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

Habits
Addictions and Bad Habits
Bad Habits
Character Habits
Character Quirks
Phobias (2)
Secrets
300 Possible Secrets to Give Your Characters
I Bet You Didn’t Know..
Character Plots And Secrets (2)
Celebrity Secrets
Secret Masterlist
Quotes
Song Lyrics Masterlist
Songs for Biographies
Favorite Quotes: TV and Movies
Favorite Quotes: Notable Authors
Favorite Quotes: Celebrities
Favorite Quotes: Popular Books (2)
Quotes From Songs
Character Quotes
Masterlist of Bio Lyrics
Masterlist of Bio Quotes
Masterlist of Song Lyrics
Biography Lyrics
A Masterlist of Quotes
+130 Quotes
The Quotation Garden
Mary Sue’s

A Mary Sue In The Inbox
Your Character Is A Sue, Not Just A Mary Or Gary
Not Writing A Mary Sue

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING
Para Titles
100 Paragraph Titles
Para Titles - Song Title Edition (2,3)
A Whole Ton of Para Titles
350+ Song Titles
Para Titles For You (2)
Starters
How to: Create an interesting starter
How to: Make an Interesting Starter
Gif Conversations: A Guide
A Brief Guide to Starters
Interesting Gif Convesation Starters
Starters Masterlist
Gif Starter Posts
46 Interesting Gif Chat Starters
Ideas for Gif Chat Starters
Starters
Careers/Jobs
Masterlist: Jobs
Possible Careers for Characters
Artistic Occupations
Martha’s Vineyard Job Masterlist
Interesting Jobs
Locations/Settings/Activities
Para Ideas
Masterlist: Para Ideas
Top 50 Places for Starters
Writing Topics: Para Ideas
101 Date Ideas
68 Date Ideas
22 Date Ideas
Popular Places to Eat
Character Developement
Character Development Questionaire
Character Surveys
C.D. Questionaire
30 Day Character Development Meme
Character Development Questions (2)
100 Pt. Questionaire
IC and OOC Surveys
Online Test for Character Building
30 Days of Character Development
How to: Develop Characters
Get To Know Your Characters
→ ROMANCE
Romance (in general)
The Little Ways a Ship Gets Build
Roleplaying Relationships
8 Ways to Say I Love You
How to: Make a Set Ship RP Work
How to: Write a Romantic Scene
Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Relationships
Putting a Label on It
Synonyms for Love
Pregnancy (2, 3, 4, 5)
Smut
Smut Guide: Casual Sex
Smut Guide: For Beginners
How to: Write a First Time Sex Scene Romantically
How to: Smut - The Bare Bones
How to: Smut (For Virgins)
How to: Write Lesbian Smut
How to: Write Smut (2, 3)
How to: Write a Blowjob/Prepping for Smut
Smut Guides of Tumblr
Tips on Writing Sex Scenes
A Guide to Language in Smut
Domination and Submission
Making Love
A Smut Guide
Kisses
How to: Write a Kiss (2)
Different Types of Kisses
Writing Out the First Kiss
→ OTHER
Plot Writing
How to: Create the Best Plot for Your RP
How to: Create A Plot Outline in 8 Steps
How to: Write A Plot in 12 Steps
How to: Write A Quality Plot
How to: Spice Up Your Roleplay Plots
Components of Your Plot Page
Writing Up A Plot
Basics of Writing A Plot
Links for Plot Writing Help
Eight Unique Plot Ideas
Plot Twists
Situation Ideas (2, 3)
Guide to Plotting
Eras
Eras Masterlist
Everything You Need to Know Abut the 20’s
20’s Slang
Primary Sources on Ancient Civilizations
How to: Play the Greek Goddess ‘Harmonia’
How to: Roleplay In the Victorian Era
Victorian Dialogue

thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.

→ GENERAL

Improvement

Describing

Masterlists

  Body Language

Grammar/Vocabulary

Writer’s Block

→ APPLICATIONS

Application (Itself)

Para (Sample)

Prompts

→ GUIDES

Personalities

Disorders

Disabilities

Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs

Drugs

Locations

Genders

Supernatural

Other

→ CREATING CHARACTERS

Biography Writing

Names

Personalities

Personality Traits
Habits

Secrets

Quotes

Mary Sue’s

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING

Para Titles

Starters

Careers/Jobs

Locations/Settings/Activities

Character Developement

→ ROMANCE

Romance (in general)

Smut

Kisses

→ OTHER

Plot Writing

Eras

(via ilovereadingandwriting)

Source: thewritersarchive
Photo
worddocs:

Is your description dull? Does your figurative language fall flat? Are you forever stating the obvious in the quest to depict your world? Never fear! Here are some resources on effective description to help you put the punch back in your writing.


Using Vivid Description

Sensory Detail Word Bank

The Art of Description


Effective Description is not a Sin

Using Concrete Detail (Prezi)

Fictional Truth and Significant Detail in Short Fiction


On Some Fallacies of Some Amateur Fiction


Tips for Writers: Specific Details Spell Success


The Key to Descriptive Writing: Specificity


4 Reasons to Include Sensory Details in Writing


Features of Effective Writing: Support and Elaboration


Incorporating Imagery in Your Fiction Writing


Explaining too Much: Why Less is More


Writing Powerful Description


Sensory Details Chart


- Dr. K & Dr. E
Photo

clevergirlhelps:

Follow Forever

Quality people all run these blogs, so you should check them out.

andworldbuildingtoo § bookgeekconfessions § characterandwritinghelp § cleverhelp § elumish § fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment § fuckyeahforensics § fuckyourwritinghabits § houseoffantasists § howtofightwrite § its-a-writer-thing § lazyresources § midnightreference § referenceforwriters § theinformationdump § thewritershelpers § thewritingcafe § writing-questions-answered § writeworld

Resources

General

Names

Writing

Conworlding

Characters

Fantasy

Research

Free Music

Art

(via thewritingcafe)

Source: clevergirlhelps
Photo

japanese-revision:

japanese-revision:

Textbooks:

Online and Phone Dictionaries:

For kanji.

Online reading:


Manga.

Improving your speaking:


Listening:


Reading & Writing practice:


News:

YouTube:

Japanese sign language.


TV:

Tumblr:


Those who are studying in Japan
2012 - 2013 exchange students

Working as part of the JET Programme

Blogging:


Learning websites:

Other resources:

I’ve added even more to the list since I first posted this and am continuing to add new things to it. So, I thought I’d re-post it. As always, if anyone has anything they would like to add, let me know!

Source: japanese-revision
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